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Computer Science: Standard Syllabi Database and Web App

About the Project

Note: Dr. Cunningham drafted the description below for this project. Dr. Davidson agreed to sponsor it.

Below is the format for the two-page syllabus required for each CSci course in the 2019-20 ABET Self-Study document.
What do you think about the following as a Senior Project this semester? And would anyone be willing to sponsor it?

- Develop a database to store the relevant course information for ALL courses offered by the department (including any CSci 490s, 581/582, Engr, etc. topics taught multiple times).

Most of this is described in the form description, but there are, of course, various relationships among the data elmenents that should be made explicit. For example, the course student outcomes should be mapped to the program-level student outcomes.

Note: Consider keeping that data over time, not just one snapshot at some point in time.

- Develop a Web-hosted editor for the database info (including appropriate login capability). The Web editor should ensure that the database is well-structured. For example, if a course lists a prerequisite, the prerequisite should exist in the database. If the course list a faculty member of an instructor and/or coordinator, that person should be in the faculty listing in the database.

Note: The intention is that various faculty and staff members will enter and edit the information in the database. Others will be able to get info from the database but not edit it.

- Develop the capability to query the database to display useful, well-formatted reports on the website

- Develop an output facility to generate the appendix in Word, etc. of the two-page standard syllabi

- Develop an analyzer and report to check coverage of the program outcomes and perhaps specific curricular requirements

- Other appropriate capabilities

APPENDIX A – COURSE SYLLABI

Please use the following format for the course syllabi (2 pages maximum in Times New Roman 12-point font)

1. Course number and name

Note: Should handle special topics offerings on different topics as distinct.

2. Credits and contact hours

3. Instructor's or course coordinator’s name

Note: Might be several people involved.

4. Text book, title, author, and year
a. other supplemental materials

Note: Might be no textbook, several textbooks. Textbooks might be on website.

5. Specific course information
a. brief description of the content of the course (catalog description)
b. prerequisites or co-requisites
c. indicate whether a required, elective, or selected elective (as per Table 5-1) course in the program

6. Specific goals for the course
a. specific outcomes of instruction, ex. The student will be able to explain the significance of current research about a particular topic.
b. explicitly indicate which of the student outcomes listed in Criterion 3 or any other outcomes are addressed by the course.

Note: We potentiall map each course-level student outcomes to one or more program-level student outcomes

7. Brief list of topics to be covered

Project Summary

01/28/2019

Website

Contact Information

Dr. Kristin Davidson

kdavidso@olemiss.edu


Minitab-Style Data Visualization Tool in Python

About the Project

I have a data visualization tool that I'd like to be developed using Python. I'm a fan of the Minitab style graphing interface. Sadly, it is Windows-only, and there are no other tools (in my opinion) similarly easy to use for Mac.

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Desktop/Server Application

Contact Information

Dr. J. Adam Jones, Computer & Information Science

jadamj@acm.org


Software for IoT Whole-House Audio Pre-Amplifier (Collaboration with EE Senior Design Group)

About the Project

Last semester my (Electrical Engineering) Senior Design 1 students did a paper design of an IOT whole-house audio pre-amplifier. Attached is one of the better final reports I received from my students. (See the Senior Project instructors for this document.)

This semester in Senior Design 2 I intend to have a design group of 3 or 4 students continue this project and end up with a complete product prototype. I think that design of software to make the hardware a completely functioning product could be a nice project for one of [the computer science] students.


Paul M. Goggans, Ph. D.
Professor of Electrical Engineering
University of Mississippi
Anderson Hall Room 302
University, MS 38677
U.S.A.
O: +1-662-915-5954 | F: +1-662-915-7216
goggans@olemiss.edu | www.olemiss.edu

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Desktop/Server Application

Contact Information

Dr. Paul M. Goggans, Electrical Engineering

goggans@olemiss.edu

(662) 915-5954


Student Disability Services (SDS): PDF to EPUB Converter

About the Project

Design a PDF to ePub converter that is very simple to use, has a step-by-step wizard and intuitive user interface, cross-platform compatible with Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, and iOS, and above all, the application must be 100% accessible to blind users of screen readers.

Most ePub converters are not very accurate or accessible. As far as conversion accuracy is concerned, when it comes to converting textbooks that have a lot of things going on (i.e. text boxes, definitions in the margin, tables, charts, graphs, pictures with text in them, etc.), ePub converters do not do very well with so much page content variation. For example, textbooks such as Sociology, Philosophy, Psychology, Biology, History, etc. are very difficult to convert from PDF in ePub accurately and will require a great deal of post conversion editing on the ePub document. This can take hours or days depending on the size of the e-book. Therefore, to have an application to be able to perform this work automatically and create an ePub document with a minimum of 99% accuracy would save hours and days of processing and editing. In turn, it will allow the student to receive their alternate format, if ePub is their preference, in a relatively short period of time. Also, accessibility built into the product would enable anyone who is blind to be able to use the application and covert their own PDF document into ePub format if they desire. Many people who have disabilities work in Disability Support Services and this type of application with built-in accessibility would be of great benefit to them. Lastly, this application must have another step-by-step tool to make sure the final converted ePub document is in itself accessible. It must guide the user in making sure pertinent images with and without text in them have alternate text added and to make sure any other page contents such as tables, charts, and graphs are properly described and accessible.

As a final note, considering portable devices like tablets and smart phones are the most common devices used by students and anyone today, ePub format is the best book format to use on these smaller devices due to the reflowable text capability.

Clarification: (from Mr. Weier after questions by Dr. Cunningham)

I’m talking about converting an accessible, tagged PDF into an ePub format. If an accessible, tagged PDF is converted into an ePub, then the ePub would be accessible as well. Maybe there could be some post accessibility editing on a few aspects in the ePub format, but nothing major. The vast majority of the accessibility work would have been done when the PDF was tagged for accessibility.

If an image PDF was converted into an ePub format, I don’t think the ePub format would be accessible either. That would defeat the purpose of accessibility.

There is a lot of information on the Internet about PDF accessibility, ePub accessibility and conversion from accessible PDF into accessible ePub. However, the tools to convert PDF to ePub are not accessible to blind people who use a screen reader or a keyboard only to navigate the utility.

The end goal of this is make an application fully accessible to screen readers where someone who is blind can convert the accessible PDF to an accessible ePub independently and with ease. The application must be intuitive and have a wizard to guide you in the process step-by-step.

There is a huge market today for screen reader accessible applications. They not only benefit people with disabilities, but also people without disabilities. I don’t have a disability, but I prefer to use accessible applications because of the flexibility and ease of use. I know many people without a disability that prefer to use applications that are accessible for this very reason.

I know this could be an excessive undertaking for a project due to the time constraints, but you never know. Get someone who is ambitious and they could end up being the next Steve Jobs or Bill Gates. You never know.

If you need any advice and information about best practices for an accessible application, I can give you more detailed information and why these best practices are important to people with disabilities.

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Desktop/Server Application

Contact Information

James A. Weier, Adaptive Tech Specialist, SDS

jaweier@olemiss.edu

(662) 915-7128


CoreLogic: Production Triage Status

About the Project

Courtney Humphries (liaison: chumphries@corelogic.com) :

When a production error occurs, a lot of emails are generated and a lot of team interruption. The idea behind this project would be to send an email to the production triage email address and the information in the email would be logged into a DB and rendered into a webpage with a history of the emails. This would allow stakeholders to monitor the webpage to get updates and it would be logged for reference at a later point.

Group emails on the page by date and then subject.
The Datetime, From, and Body of the email would need to show in the page.
The most recent body would be shown. “Don’t show the entire thread for each body displayed on the page.”
Order by Date and Time in descending order.

Requirements:
1. AS A stakeholder of an application
2. I WANT to be able to get a status update easily
3. SO THAT I don’t have to interrupt the team while they are trying to resolve the issue

Preferred Technologies:
• C#
• Microsoft .NET Core 2.1 or Higher
• Angular 5 or higher
• Bootstrap 4
• Microsoft SQL Server

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Website

Contact Information

CoreLogic: Chris Floyd (sponsor)

cfloyd@corelogic.com

(662) 832-5562


CoreLogic: System Status Dashboard

About the Project

Courtney Humphries (liaison: chumphries@corelogic.com) Our company designs and supports various external facing applications/platforms. On occasion, those applications may experience downtime, sluggishness, or present error messages. Today we communicate the status of an application by using the below Confluence page (sample pasted below). Each application owner is responsible for keeping this page current.
If we need to communicate an update to our clients, it is another manual process via email. We blast email when an issue has been identified and blast again when the issue is resolved (samples pasted below). We desire to move away from all manual steps.

[Screenshot not copied from memo]

Requirements:

Design and build a web application that can “poll” each of our applications to gather current health statuses every 5 minutes via a standard REST API. A probably list of pages needed in the website is:

1. A dashboard showing the current health of each application
a. If an application is in a bad state, show the current reason why
2. A way to register a new application, its API endpoint, and an email address to be notified in the event of a “bad” response
3. A way to update any existing application with new endpoints/contact emails
4. A way to manually set an application to “BAD” and specify why. This would not be overridden in the event that a “poll” comes back “GOOD”. The application must manually be set back to “GOOD”

The following are nice-to-haves but not required:
1. A way to view the past day, week, or month’s worth of health status for any given application
2. When viewing the application dashboard, show live updates on the page without requiring a refresh

Preferred Technologies:
• C#
• Microsoft .NET Core 2.1 or Higher
• Angular 5 or higher
• Bootstrap 4
• Microsoft SQL Server

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Website

Contact Information

CoreLogic: Chris Churchill-Medlock (sponsor)

cmedlock@corelogic.com

(662) 236-8523


CoreLogic: Automated Test Writer

About the Project

Courtney Humphries (liaison: chumphries@corelogic.com)

Overview:

Testing is a necessary and crucial step to include when writing any form of application. This is no exception for web applications. As our developers write controllers with different API endpoints that handle any logic within a page, they are also creating opportunities for automated tests to be created. This process of writing these tests is tedious and occasionally frustrating, but they are a necessity and can pay dividends in the long run when changes are made to the application later.

Requirements:

Design and build a web application that can automatically generate these automated C# component tests given the following pieces of information:

a. A sample json or xml payload to be sent to the endpoint.
- The values for each data-point in this payload will be considered the “default” values in any tests generated.

b. The url for the endpoint

c. Whether the wanted action is an API Post or an API Put

Once the application has the above pieces of information, it will present a UI to the user where they can enter any number of custom values for each data-point in the json or xml payload. Additionally, the user should be able to enter the expected HTTP Response Code for this custom value, as well as any potential error messages that may be sent back with the response.

Once the user is satisfied with the data they have entered, the application will generate an automated component test for each custom value the user entered in the previous step, where the value of that specific data-point is replaced with the custom value the user entered, and the rest of the data-points are set to the “default” values as provided in the original sample json or xml payload from the user. Each test will make the appropriate post or put action with the json or xml payload to the endpoint url, as provided by the user earlier in the process, and then assert that HTTP Response Code and any potential error messages match what the user entered for that custom value.

The application should be able to give the user fully runnable tests without any modifications, so it will also have to give the user a Data Transfer Object for the JSON or XML payload, as provided by the user, as well as code that can handle generic API Post or Put actions to any endpoint given any payload.

Preferred Technologies:

• C#
- CodeDOM is a good place to start for the Code Generation functionality

• Microsoft .Net Framework 4.6.2 or higher OR Microsoft .Net Core 2.1 or higher

• Bootstrap 4 or higher

• AngularJS 6 or higher

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Website

Contact Information

CoreLogic: Devin Rossetti (sponsor)

drossetti@corelogic.com

(662) 236-8334


Collaborative Writing Avatar

About the Project

I would like to begin on a project that's been on my mind for some time. I am strongly committed to teaching students how work/write in collaboration with others. This is an important skill, and many industries and organizations require collaborative experience in those they hire.

I teach online, and as you might imagine, teaching collaboration in an online setting can be daunting to both faculty and student. And there are independent study courses where only 1 student is in the course - so how can we teach them collaborative skills (keep in mind my primary focus is writing in professional settings).

When I read about medical and education schools using avatars to teach certain concepts, I thought that coming up with what I call "collaborative avatars" might have a fantastic application in the settings I describe above.

What I envision is an avatar that is programmed to make certain responses and articulate certain attitudes that are common to group work ("I'm sorry, but I have to go out of town - I won't be able to make our meeting and work o our project"). I have some basic understanding of computers and technology, but I've not kept up with AI or recent innovations in avatars (I explored them a bit as a grad student researching interactive elements of websites).

Anyway, if you think this is a project that would transfer into the setting of your class, I would begin by asking that the student
* research use of avatars
* research/understand the specific need for a writerly avatar, and
* design an avatar that could be integrated into a learning project suitable for an online course.
They would not have to develop course content - just work on the avatar.

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Website

Contact Information

Dr. Alice Johnston Myatt, Writing & Rhetoric

amyatt1@olemiss.edu

(662) 915-7678


Student Disability Services: Accessible Safe Exam Browser

About the Project

Student Disability Services (SDS) has a Testing Center in Kinard Hall. We have students that take online tests and to lock down the browser I have researched the accessibility of various products: Safe Exam Browser, LanSchool, and Net Support School. There are not many out there. LanSchool and Net Support School do have features to lock down the browser and to prevent or allow applications, but those two also have many other features that we don’t need. So, those 2 applications are overkill for our needs. In contrast, Safe Exam Browser has as its only function to lock down the browser and to prevent or allow applications. All 3 are NOT fully accessible. LanSchool and Net Support School you have to purchase. Safe Exam Browser is free. I did run my accessibility evaluation on all 3 products and notified my contact for each of the 3 products about the inherent accessibility issues. Of course, all 3 say they will give the results to their developers and work on implementing accessibility in future iterations of their product. However, I know how that goes. Anyway, I was wondering if it would be possible to create an application similar to Safe Exam Browser, but make it fully accessible to keyboard navigation and focus and to screen readers.

Here is the website for Safe Exam Browser: https://www.safeexambrowser.org/news_en.html. Here, you can download and install a free copy Safe Exam Browser to see how it works. Their product works with both Windows and MAC, but to make it easier, we would only require it to work with Windows for now. We would definitely want the application to be similar in function to Safe Exam Browser. Safe Exam Browser is its own browser essentially and you can allow or block applications, including assistive technology. Also, you can allow or block various websites. It is a good product and we do wish it was accessible, but since it is not and the developer knew this up front even before I sent my accessibility evaluation to the developer, it would not be a good idea for us in SDS to as inaccessible product. We try to practice what we preach since we are supposed to be the poster child for accessibility on campus.

Once again, since SDS has a testing center in Kinard, we really need a product like Safe Exam Browser and how it functions, but fully accessible to keyboard navigation, keyboard focus, and screen reader accessibility.

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Desktop/Server Application

Contact Information

James A. Weier, Adaptive Tech Specialist, SDS

jaweier@olemiss.edu

(662) 915-7128


Student Disability Services: Multilingual Ebook Reader

About the Project

Design an electronic, human-like, SAPI 5 voice that can switch as it reads in real time between 2 different languages (i.e. English and Spanish) when the language is encountered in the foreign language e-book by the electronic voice. This voice must be smart enough to recognize the difference in language when encountered on the page and switch automatically, seamlessly and in real-time between both languages. This would allow anyone who has a print disability as well as a blind person to learn a foreign language independently.

Currently, electronic voices only allow one type of language at a time. For a student who has a print disability or blind preferring to have the foreign language book in an electronic format and to be able to listen to the text using an electronic voice, they would have to manually change from one voice for a language and switch to the alternate voice for another language. This is cumbersome and not efficient or effective for the student. Not to mention, time consuming. Even if this can be done, only a sighted user could attempt to do this because they would be able to see the change in language and then be able to change the electronic voice when necessary. A blind person would not be able to do this at all independently. Even so, this process still would not be practical for any person wanting to listen to their electronic text version of a foreign language textbook. As a result, with today’s technology, the best way for a student with a print disability to be able to access their foreign language textbook in another way is to utilize a tutor. This takes away from their independence and many students with disabilities prefer to study on their own and not have to acquire the assistance of another person.

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Desktop/Server Application

Contact Information

James A. Weier, Adaptive Tech Specialist

jaweier@olemiss.edu

(662) 915-7128


FNB Oxford: Digital Tracking of Safe Deposit Box Access

About the Project

FNB currently use little sheets of paper to track customer access to safe deposit boxes in our vault. We would like customers to be able to sign in using a tablet (sign the tablet with a finger or electronic pen). I imagine a web application with the administrative and reporting areas. The tablet would have an app which accesses the MySQL (or whatever free database) on a local server.

For setting up a "new" box or changing the ownership of a box, it should query the core database using the API provided by the core vendor. The API is called XChange; it uses plain-text XML and a tcp socket for communication.

All communication to the server must be secure.

We prefer the tablet be an iPad or iPad mini, but will consider the use of Android.

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Website

Contact Information

Bill Taylor, CIO, FNB Oxford

haabda@gmail.com

(662) 816-1682


FNB Oxford: Add Feature to Home-built Wire (money transfers between banks) Tracking Application

About the Project

This project requires a student to be able to understand existing code and add features.

I have an existing web application written in PHP using a MySQL backend. This system tracks all of our incoming and outgoing wires (except for wires originating in our Online Banking Platform). I would like to improve it by adding the ability for customers to set up wire templates. For example, I want the customer to be able to call us and tell us to "send wire 3232AB".

I also want our tracking system to be able to import wires from the Online Banking System so we can track them all in one place. (I recently added this feature myself, but that doesn't mean it couldn't be improved upon.)

New Federal rules mandate we track some new fields in wires. The application needs to be modified to support the new fields.
(3600) DRW - Drawdown Payment
(4400) Drawdown Information.

Project Summary

01/24/2019

Website

Contact Information

Bill Taylor, CIO, FNB Oxford

haabda@gmail.com

(662) 816-1682