Spatial Perception In Virtual Environments: it’s not just what you see but how you see it

CIS Seminar
3:00 PM, Wed. March 18 2015
235 Weir Hall

Spatial Perception In Virtual Environments: it’s not just what you see but how you see it

Abstract: In recent years, virtual reality (VR) has been gaining substantial public acceptance, but there are still several usability issues that have yet to be addressed. VR is inherently spatial in nature, but there are many well-known problems that affect how its users behave and perform tasks in 3-dimensions.  In this presentation, we will look at several issues that affect the spatial accuracy of VR.  Two specific factors that that will be addressed are field of view configuration and the physiology of the observer’s eye.  The field of view available in VR displays has changed radically in recent years, growing from a typical extent of 60° to over 90°.  We will discuss a series of experiments examining the effect of field of view on spatial perception in VR.  Another potentially impactful avenue for VR is in the development of “high fidelity” virtual environments for use in spatially sensitive tasks such as surgery and precision manufacturing.  Tasks such as these can require sub-millimeter accuracy, but in order to achieve this, we must consider the characteristics of both the technology and the user.
 
Bio: Dr. J. Adam Jones is a postdoctoral research associate in the School of Computing’s Human-Centered Computing Division at Clemson University.  His research investigates the factors that affect the perceptual realism of virtual and augmented reality.  Dr. Jones previously worked in the Mixed Reality Lab at the University of Southern California where he worked with Oculus VR founder Palmer Luckey.  He also has on-going collaborations with the Human Systems Integration Division at NASA Ames Research Center.  Dr. Jones completed his Ph.D. in Computer Science & Engineering with emphases in Visualization and Cognitive Science at Mississippi State University.